Organic vs Conventional

Organic farms

Vary depending on their certification and practices, but most foster biological diversity and the health of the consumer, soil and environment.
Natural methods
Instead of using harmful chemicals or bio-engineering, organic farms use natural methods, such as diversifying and rotating crops, and using natural fertilizer or cover crops to maximize soil fertility.
Positive effects
Healthy, organic soil produces nutrient-rich crops year after year, natural eco-systems are kept in balance, and most importantly, there is no pesticide or chemical run-off that leaches into our groundwater and oceans.

More about the Benefits of Organics.


Conventional farms

Refer to growers using methods that are unfortunately the most widespread.
Unnatural methods
Conventional farms may use whatever means (within basic safety laws) to kill pests and maximize output: chemicals, synthetics, or genetically-modified organisms. There's no check for sustainability, and the EPA has set allowable levels of chemical/pesticide residues, which most environmental health advocates and consumers believe are too high.
Personal and environmental harm
Common conventional farming is unsustainable. Chemical pesticides, fertilizers, and GMOs are harmful to our personal health, and steadily it's stripping the health of the farmland, our fresh water supply, and marine wildlife.
Limited benefits
In addition, there are numerous studies that have shown that conventional methods do not produce significantly higher yields than organic methods.

For the sake of our own sustenance and environment, we need to switch to more natural, sustainable methods.
More about:
Conventional Farming
Certifications and Converting to Organic